Unit 14: Vocabulary

Please study the 19 vocabulary terms below. Then press the Mark Complete button to continue.
US
UK
apologize
to express regret over a mistake or an inconvenience that one caused
US
UK
Martha apologized for falsely accusing Jared of stealing her food from the communal fridge.
US
UK
awkward
lacking in grace, causing embarrassment and discomfort
US
UK
Nobody wanted to take responsibility for the blunder, which led to an awkward silence before Ellen finally spoke up.
US
UK
breach of contract
an act that violates or goes against the terms agreed on at a certain point, which were specified in a binding agreement
US
UK
When the farmer failed to deliver the agreed upon amount of grain, the brewery sued him for breach of contract.
US
UK
bullying
deliberately intimidating, hurting, or frightening someone in order to aggressively exert dominance over them
US
UK
The marketing manager was notorious for bullying his subordinates, always belittling them and shouting at them in front of other employees.
US
UK
harassment
uninvited and unwelcome behavior that causes someone to feel uncomfortable, intimidated, or violated
US
UK
Sexual harassment comes in many forms and can range from inappropriate verbal comments to physically touching somebody intimately without their consent.
US
UK
inappropriate
unsuitable or unacceptable especially in a particular situation
US
UK
Ed received a formal warning for making inappropriate comments about his co-workers' appearance.
US
UK
keep one’s cool
to remain calm and even-tempered in a stressful situation
US
UK
I admire my colleague for his ability to keep his cool whenever he encounters a problem because I see that he is much more efficient at solving it.
US
UK
mediate
to act as the middleman in a conflict or argument in order to help resolve it
US
UK
My co-workers are quite short-tempered, so I usually end up mediating for them.
US
UK
misconduct
wrongful, improper, or unacceptable behavior, often dangerous or illegal in nature
US
UK
He was forced to resign for serious misconduct, including embezzlement and fraud.
US
UK
offensive
actively aggressive and disrespectful, causing somebody else to feel upset, hurt, or angry
US
UK
There are many terms that used to be considered socially acceptable but are now considered offensive, and should not be used.
US
UK
procrastinate
to put off doing something until later
US
UK
I know that I have a tendency to procrastinate, so I set myself deadlines a week before the actual deadline so I won't miss it.
US
UK
professional
being very good at one's job, with high standards, acting in a way not led by emotion but by rational
US
UK
When the clients she was negotiating with lost their temper and started shouting, Sarah remained professional and managed to de-escalate the situation through mediation.
US
UK
put on the spot
to be forced to quickly make a difficult statement when one is not expecting it
US
UK
When Jolene was unexpectedly asked to present at the meeting, she felt like she was put on the spot and struggled to keep her cool.
US
UK
report someone
to inform a higher authority about another person's misconduct
US
UK
When Peter wouldn't stop making inappropriate and offensive comments about Lana, she threatened to report him to their supervisor.
US
UK
reputation
public image, the collective idea, beliefs, or opinion that other people have of a specific person or entity
US
UK
An important reason why I'm applying to this company is that they have a great reputation.
US
UK
stand up for
to speak or act in order to defend someone
US
UK
I used to be very shy and let people push me around, but I have been working on standing up for myself.
US
UK
take credit for
to let others believe one was responsible for something worthy of praise and attention
US
UK
I worked really hard on this project, but my colleague took all the credit for it by presenting it as his own work.
US
UK
take the high road
to not let others push one into behaving badly, especially when they are, but rather choose the most noble and moral course of action
US
UK
Even though he fired insults at her, she decided to take the high road and walked away gracefully.
US
UK
whistleblower
a person who reveals secret information about an organization's illegal or immoral activity to the public
US
UK
Edward Snowden became one of the most infamous whistleblowers of this millennium when he leaked classified information about the NSA in 2013.
Go to unit menu